New guidance on DNACPR – clearer, between the grey areas

A new version of the BMA/Resus Council/RCN resuscitation guideline is out, and it makes for interesting reading. The ideal circumstance, where a patient with capacity is well enough and has time enough to engage in a discussion about the merits of CPR, is well described. It is in the emergency setting, where capacity fluctuates, time runs short and loved ones are terribly stressed, that difficulties can occur. It is for doctors in those situations that the guideline has some new things to say.

 

The need to inform (or try to inform)

Even when CPR has no realistic prospect of success, there must be a presumption in favour of explaining the need and basis for a DNACPR decision to a patient, or to those close to a patient who lacks capacity.

The guideline incorporates the Janet Tracey and Carl Winspear rulings – the requirement to inform patients with mental capacity, legal representatives or relatives about DNACPR decisions as soon as possible. Although keeping those connected to the patient involved in decision-making is an obvious mark of good practise, it is possible that appropriate DNACPR decisions are delayed while the ‘informing’ stage is arranged and undertaken. To those of a defensive disposition, it has felt, post-Tracey, as though DNACPR decisions cannot be put in the notes until that stage has been completed. The guideline makes it very clear that this is not the case,

…it is important that the decision is not delayed (and the quality of care of the patient compromised thereby) if the patient’s family members or other carers are not contactable immediately to have the decision explained to them. A timely decision must be made in the patient’s best interests in order to provide them with high-quality care, and that decision and the reasons for making it must be documented fully. All reasonable effort must be made to contact those close to the patient to explain the decision, preferably in person, as soon as is practicable and appropriate.  

If the relatives are not contactable (including by phone in the middle of the night– a lesson learnt in the Winspear case), it is vital (as ever) to document your attempts fully.

My own take on the question how to ‘inform’, is that the task is far more complex than it seems. Most of us are not able to convey such a symbolically powerful decision without introducing the subject gently and framing it sensitively; the conversation may start as an explanation of what is going on medically, but depending on the relative’s response it may then become an exploration of the patient’s life and goals, or of the relative’s assumed role as permission giver in the decision-making process. The skilful doctor will find ways of reversing this misapprehension, but even in experienced hands the conversation can begin to feel like a request for assent.

However, if the going gets tough, it remains clear that…

It is not necessary to obtain the consent of a patient or of those close to a patient to a decision not to attempt CPR that has no realistic prospect of success. The patient and those close to the patient do not have a right to demand treatment that is clinically inappropriate and healthcare professionals have no obligation to offer or deliver such treatment.  

This is helpful legally, but not practically. Clinicians will continue to agonise and prevaricate in those (quite rare) situations where they are faced with opposition to the DNACPR decision. Rather than saying, ‘Actually, you have no legal right to demand CPR for your relative, I’m doing it anyway’ most doctors would say, ‘OK, well I can see there are strong feelings here, and I suggest we leave the question open and discuss it again later…’ It is easier to roll the decision over, than to do what guideline suggests… seek a second opinion.

 

Second opinions and the multi-disciplinary team

Main Message 12 says,

Where a patient or those close to a patient disagree with a DNACPR decision a second opinion should be offered. Endorsement of a DNACPR decision by all members of a multidisciplinary team may avoid the need to offer a further opinion

This is interesting. A second opinion (internal to the hospital) is a good way of addressing and diluting any sense of distrust that may have arisen. A fresh face is introduced, one who will, in all likelihood, agree with the assessment of the initial decision maker. I have certainly never altered a colleagues DNACPR decision when asked to help, but I have brought to the table a different form of words, and this can help give the family a different perspective.

More interesting still is the concept of the multi-disciplinary team in DNACPR decision making. What is this? The firm (a more fluid thing than it used to be)? A senior nurse plus the firm? Allied professionals such as physios and occupational therapists? Perhaps in non-emergency cases it might include an oncologist or surgeon, and in the gradually deteriorating patient, a palliative care team member.

As a consultant I make a habit of asking the ward team if they agree on DNACPR decisions, not least because it is good training to get them to think through the whole process, and its consequences. In my experience, senior nurses tend to have well developed opinions (usually tending to towards the opinion that CPR as largely futile, based on direct observation), while allied professionals are not used to being presented with the question, and not comfortable with it. Senior medical trainees are very good opinions, often more up to date in questions of cardiac rehabilitation or neurological recovery, while junior trainees are very much led by their consultant’s view.

Overall, I’m still not sure what the MDT is in acute scenarios (in the AMU for instance). This point in the guideline does however open the door to teams of doctors and nurses on post-take ward rounds making secure DNACPR decisions for frail patients without capacity, if I read it right.

 

When it is obvious

Main message 24 attempts to address a very common scenario – that of a patient who is clearly near the end of life suffering a cardiac arrest, in the absence of a recorded DNACPR decision. Hitherto the default has been to call the crash team and commence basic life support, followed by a few minutes of advanced life support until a suitable senior person (usually the medical registrar) arrives, assesses the situation, reads the notes or receives a summary from the ward nurse, and stops the attempt. This is the distressing end-point for many whom we, as doctors, as a health service, have failed by not addressing resuscitation at an earlier stage. The guideline says,

Where no explicit decision about CPR has been considered and recorded in advance there should be an initial presumption in favour of CPR. However, in some circumstances where there is no recorded explicit decision (for example for a person in the advanced stages of a terminal illness where death is imminent and unavoidable and CPR would not be successful) a carefully considered decision not to start inappropriate CPR should be supported.

This appears to protect the nurse or doctor who assimilates the situation quickly (and ‘carefully’) then says ‘No, don’t call the crash team’. This is a big step. We are talking ad hoc DNACPR decisions. The main text expands,

There will be some people for whom attempting CPR is clearly inappropriate; for example, a person in the advanced stages of a terminal illness where death is imminent and unavoidable and CPR would not be successful, but for whom no formal CPR decision has been made and recorded. Also, there will be cases where healthcare professionals discover patients with features of irreversible death – for example, rigor mortis. In such circumstances, any healthcare professional who makes a carefully considered decision not to start CPR should be supported by their senior colleagues, employers and professional bodies

It will take nurses of significant experience and confidence to actually do this.  Doctors are rarely present at the moment of death, so it would seem not to apply to them. I can imagine a patient arriving on ward with signs of advanced cancer who then arrests, or a frail person with severe pneumonia who suddenly deteriorates in the ED, before the admitting team has had time to finalise the DNACPR decision, or inform relatives. Whatever the intended scenario, whoever the intended actors, this new message seems to be an attempt to bring common sense into an area where perverse things have been done due a feeling that the default ‘For’ status cannot be reversed.

I wonder though, how often nurses or doctors will make this step… and if it will lead to any complaints.

 

Lost opportunity?

All this last minute, vexed decision-making can of course be minimised by pre-emptive discussions about the potential benefits of CPR. This guideline is intended primarily for those working in secondary care, and the last Main Message emphasises our duty in raising the question early,

Failure to make timely and appropriate decisions about CPR will leave people at risk of receiving inappropriate or unwanted attempts at CPR as they die. The resulting indignity, with no prospect of benefit, is unacceptable, especially when many would not have wanted CPR had their needs and wishes been explored.

This is welcome, but to me is discrepant with Main Message 2,

If cardiorespiratory arrest is not predicted or reasonably foreseeable in the current circumstances or treatment episode, it is not necessary to initiate discussion about CPR with patients

This was present in the guideline’s earlier version, and seems to be a missed opportunity to identify patients who are unlikely to benefit from CPR, even if the chance of them needing it in the next day or two is small.

According to this message, doctors can with a clear conscience avoid resuscitation discussions if they do not think cardiac arrest is likely. What’s wrong with that? Although some patients are clearly deteriorating in the context of their acute illness (e.g. severe pneumonia on a background of extreme frailty), and will clearly die soon, most are in that early period where the degree of reversibility is not clear, and although they might arrest, they might not. It is very easy (and I know this because I have done it, during weaker moments) to say, either internally or to one’s team, “They’re stable right now, there are no signs of imminent deterioration, let’s see how they are tomorrow and address DNACPR if it’s not going well…” In a frail patient this may be an abdication of responsibility, because even if there is only a 5% chance that they will arrest, you end up walking off the ward without having dealt with the consequences. I think the guideline should say, ‘If cardiorespiratory arrest does not appear imminent or likely, but nevertheless the clinical team would not be surprised if it were to occur, then a discussion about CPR should be initiated…’ (this form of thinking was first used to help identify patients who might be in the last year of life, as part of the Gold Standards Framework).

The NCEPOD study Time to Intervene recommended that a clear decision, either For Resuscitation or Not For Resuscitation, was made for every acute admission. This guideline does not entirely agree,

In its report on cardiorespiratory arrests in hospitals – Time to Intervene – the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcomes and Death (NCEPOD) recommended that “CPR status must be considered and recorded for all acute (hospital) admissions, ideally during the admission process and definitely at the initial consultant review when an explicit decision should be made in this group of patients, and clearly documented (for CPR or DNACPR)”

As noted earlier in this guidance, although the NCEPOD recommends that CPR should be considered for all acute admissions, it does not mean that it is necessary to discuss CPR with all patients admitted to hospital acutely. There are some patients who are dying from an advanced and incurable illness, for whom CPR will not work and for whom a discussion is likely to cause them to suffer harm (see section 5).

The authors of the guideline clearly recognise that early DNACPR conversations are often poor in quality, so they row back from NCEPODs more aggressive approach. This is realistic, but is it too easy on us? Surely our aspiration must be to engage early. Due to the flow of patients through hospitals, form ED to AMU to the final ward, then perhaps to another final ward, (and perhaps even a third if beds are pressurised), the momentum behind the good intention to engage the patient/family on DNACPR can easily be lost. Partial response to therapy may take the pressure off, even though the patient remains at real risk of deterioration.

The idea of causing harm to patients by forcing on them a DNACPR discussion was considered in the Tracey judgement, and it was not regarded very highly by the judge as a reason not to engage. If physical or mental harm is likely, the judge agreed it was not right to have the conversation, but distress alone was not good enough. Therefore, is it not acceptable to shy away from the conversation in the first 48 hours just because it feels unkind. Nevertheless, it is down to us to determine where distress ends and harm begins; if we think our words may hurt, then we must explain our reasoning,

(Section 5) In a minority of cases, trying to explain a DNACPR decision to a patient for whom CPR will not work will impose an unnecessary burden by causing such distress that the dying person suffers harm, which may be physical or psychological… The reasons for not explaining a decision in such circumstances must be documented fully.

 

Conclusions

At first reading this document succeeds in steering clinicians through an increasingly challenging and legalistic area. It highlights the good things in the Tracey/Winspear judgments (respect for a person’s/relative’s right to be involved, where feasible, in life changing decisions) while trying to ensure that common sense prevails. Perhaps it could do more to encourage us to engage earlier, as I do fear that busy clinicians will tend to overlook DNACPR discussions unless there is a strong, external expectation that the subject must not be put off until the next day, or the next, or the next…

 

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