Month: March 2017

Batteries are low: the work of engaging in DNACPR discussions

During a talk I gave to an audience of palliative care specialists two weeks ago (St Barnabas Hospice, Worthing, thank you for having me), I wondered how they found the energy to engage patients in discussions about dying all day, every day. The comment was undoubtedly naïve, because that’s not what they do, and the many positives that come from managing dying well must recharge the batteries. But for those like me who work in the acute hospital setting, and whose job it is to recognise the approach of dying, a form of exhaustion can occur. Sometimes this leads to missed opportunities.

Imagine a typical ward round in general medicine, or even within a narrow area like my own (liver disease): there might be three new patients with clinical features to suggest that rapid deterioration could occur at any time, which on a background of chronic disease or frailty indicates that resuscitation would be futile. It is my job to start a discussion about the place of CPR and escalation of care. Three conversations. Take a deep breath.

In the ideal world, where patients with chronic disease talk about their wishes well before admission to hospital, the door would already be ajar. Perhaps a documented plan (eg. ReSPECT, described in this week’s BMJ, UFTO, or UP*) would be produced from an overnight bag, or from a relative’s pocket. This paper, a symbol of prior reflection, would allow us to compare their goals with the facts of the situation.

It’s 9.15AM. The team is full of energy and caffeine. We have X patients to see, some of whom are on the road to recovery, some of whom have already been recognised as dying, some of whom have uncertain futures.

The trainees are attentive. They are learning how to do this (aren’t we all?). First patient. I complete my assessment, pause, then open the discussion. I won’t rehearse the words here – my version is not perfect, and it varies. If it does not vary then it shows I am just repeating some learned lines – an impression that it is important to avoid. (Interestingly, a patient involved in the BMJ’s article commented, in reference to a particular form of words, it was ‘as if this is what they had all been taught to say.’)

So I open the patient’s mind to the possibility of dying (be it suddenly or gradually). Perhaps their next of kin is present. They react in their own way. A faraway look is not uncommon. Sometimes a film develops over the eyes, glistening in the morning light of the nearby window. Poetry has no place here, but as a human, I am affected by the impact of my words. We reach an understanding – we agree – CPR is not the right thing to do. If the patient or a relative disagrees, we park it, and arrange to speak about it again, later. I walk away, unsure how to close the interaction. A hand on the arm, a swish of the curtain (‘or would you like me to keep it closed?’). There is no comfortable way, to be honest.

Outside the bay we complete the DNACPR form – put the bureaucratic stamp on it, for the benefit of others who might be called to see the patient in an emergency.

“Ok. Where to next?”

We see a couple more patients. Then the registrar says, “We probably need to discuss escalation with the next one, she’s —–.” We review the history, the data, and agree, yes, we need to anticipate the worst, even if, crossing fingers, it doesn’t happen during this admission.

I use subtly different words, but move in the same direction. This time there is a more overt reaction. And a longer discussion. The thought of dying has never crossed her mind. Nor her husband’s. Part of me brims with anger – she has an incurable, gradually worsening condition, she has been seen by her GP and in specialist clinics umpteen times over the last year; why has no-one brought this up? Why does it have to be me, now? I could just leave it. She might not deteriorate after all. Why not leave it until she does… but if that is at 3AM, and a foundation year doctor is asked to see her, and she refers to a registrar who has never met the patient, there will be hurried decision making, the patient will probably not be conscious enough to express their wishes, an ICU consultant will be asked to make a call based on scanty information…  bad medicine. It must be done now.

We finish. It took half an hour. Not long in the life of the patient, relative to the magnitude of the subject under discussion. But very long in the context of a ward round. Never mind. The time must be taken.

We see some more patients.

Then we come to the third.

I enter the bed space. The visit proceeds along routine lines while I make a general assessment. Then I reach a fork in the path. Now is the time to level with them. But I am not up to it. I have left two patients in mute distress (possibly; how could it be otherwise?). I have re-formulated the words to keep them fresh and sincere and specific to them. I have struck a balance between brutal realism (I’m not one for drawing a vivid picture of CPR, but the act has to be mentioned) and sensitivity. I have asked myself, as we continued our progress along the ward, ‘am I bring too pessimistic here? If the other doctors they saw didn’t bring up dying, perhaps I shouldn’t either…’) – and I make a decision. Not today. Another day. Let’s talk about it on Wednesday. I haven’t got the energy. Or I’ll ask to the registrar to do it, she’s good.

“So are they still for resus?” asks the nurse.

“Yes.”

“What if they deteriorate?”

“We’ll cross that bridge when we come to it. Sorry.”

And so we move on, hoping that the worst doesn’t happen before we find the time and the energy – a very specific form of energy – to broach the subject.

 

 

* ReSPECT = Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care & Treatment; UFTO = Universal Form of Treatment Options; UP = Unwell and Potentially Deteriorating Patient Plan. According to the BMJ this week, In Torbay, where Treatment Escalation Plans were introduced to replace DNACPR forms in 2006, ‘30% of elderly patients now arrive [at the hospital] with a TEP.’

 

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When death is not the end

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This week’s report about a nurse being disciplined for failing to ‘revive’ a clearly deceased nursing home resident, has caused consternation. According to the description given, the woman was ‘yellow, waxy, almost cold’. But a rule mandated that the nurse on duty should commence basic life support and call an ambulance. For her to be punished seems perverse*.

The big fail here is not so much the rule (which is to maximise safety and ensure that no opportunities are lost to reverse acute deterioration), but the fact that the woman did not have a community DNACPR order. Such an oversight could be written about at length, and the difficulties doctors, families and patients have discussing the subject have been explored on this blog.

The other problem this case reveals is our general confusion about the transition between life and death. There is a phase in dying, perhaps fifteen minutes (longer if hypothermic – I am happy to be corrected) where vigorous efforts to restart the heart might result in more life and acceptable cerebral function. For this to happen, the heart and other organs need to be in reasonable condition. If death was sudden, re-opening a coronary artery might be all that is required. But if the patient had been ailing for a year, or succumbed to a spreading cancer, nothing will work.

So, when a nurse or a member of the public comes across a seemingly dead person, what tells them whether it is right to start basic life support, or respectfully cover their face? If the situation is at all unclear, it seems there is only one defensible answer – try to resuscitate.

When I did Advanced Cardiac Life Support training years ago I was fascinated (and disgusted) by a paragraph in the manual that described situations where resuscitation was clearly inappropriate. These included decapitation and separation of the body into two halves (sorry to make you queasy, that’s what it said; I’m not sure if the current version still includes this). It may have mentioned rigor mortis. But it did not talk about the ‘waxy’ or ‘almost cold’ person.

Faced with such ambiguity, people are quick to refer back to earlier times, when community doctors or wise neighbours were called to see people in their homes, whereupon they calmly observed that the patient had died and that there was nothing more to be done. Now, such acceptance can only occur if, prior to death, there has been a series of clear discussions and agreements (all documented) regarding resuscitation, transfer to hospital, or escalation of care.

This has come about because modern medical techniques can do much to delay death. The burden of heroic interventions has to be considered of course, hence the need to think about such things before they happen. However, the medical reflex is to treat and save. The reflex applies to all people by default, even those who appear too frail to benefit. Thus, the nursing home has a ‘reflex’ that patients found unconscious and without a pulse should be rushed to hospital unless there is a DNACPR order in place.

This evolution in our ability to preserve life has diminished the validity of the experienced nurse’s, or lay-person’s, impression. He or she is no longer trusted to recognise established death. In the case reported this week, the diagnosis of death was, presumably, only valid if made by paramedics, or by the A&E doctors who might have received her (intubated, cannulated, perhaps with intraosseous access lines protruding from both shins).

There is an argument that only those who have been trained to certify death should be allowed to bear the responsibility, and it is interesting to note that the nurse in this report has subsequently received such training. However, a part of me wonders how it is that death, which has been part of our experience since homo sapiens began spread across the globe, is still such a mystery that one needs to go on a course to recognise it.

Most ward nurses, or trainee doctors who have led a crash team, will have been in a similar situation. From a doctor’s point of view – the crash call goes out, you run to the ward, and observe nursing colleagues performing basic life support. Collateral information soon paints a fuller picture – the patient was last seen alive four hours ago; they were ‘stone cold’ when the nurse came to routine observations at 6AM; clearly, the patient died peacefully in their sleep. But, in the absence of a DNACPR order, a crash call had to go out. As the medical registrar you must now decide whether to call the resuscitation attempt off immediately, or continue for a few minutes just to make sure that there is no return of spontaneous circulation (a heartbeat and a pulse). Most doctors in this situation continue until they are sure the patient is truly dead, as they will not have known the patient and do not feel confident in stopping the attempt immediately. Some of the reasoning here is defensive. You could be criticised for saying ‘stop’ without having gone through the algorithm.

It seems to me that there is still a place for the healthcare worker’s common sense opinion, especially if they know the patient – ‘She has died, let’s ring the next of kin… no, don’t call the ambulance, don’t start compressions. They have died.’

Recent BMA/resuscitation council guidelines do, to some extent, take such ‘common sense’ into account –

…there will be cases where healthcare professionals discover patients with features of irreversible death – for example, rigor mortis. In such circumstances, any healthcare professional who makes a carefully considered decision not to start CPR should be supported by their senior colleagues, employers and professional bodies’. [see previous post on this here]

Despite this, and even with the support of medical colleagues, while nurses feel vulnerable to censure, only those with great confidence will risk not calling the crash team when they find a dead patient.

 

* We have very few details, so the arguments and conclusions drawn from the case here are generalised

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