Not in my name

  A recent coroner’s report caught my attention (highlighted by HSJ's Shaun Lintern via Twitter). A patient died from a ruptured aortic aneurysm, and during the investigation it was discovered that it had been seen on a CT scan four years earlier. However, the patient never came to hear of it, the GP was not informed, and... Continue Reading →

This private life

How far does the right to ‘private life’ go? Noel Conway, who has motor neurone disease, feels that his inability to arrange an assisted death without fear of his ‘assistant’ being prosecuted, is an intrusion on his right to private life. He is barred from taking steps to manage his death in the way he... Continue Reading →

Think like me

Last week I delivered a lecture about resuscitation decisions. Part of it was a scenario, carefully thought out with my co-presenting colleague. We described a lady in the 80s, living in a residential home, with a degree of heart failure and some other co-morbidities, who had been admitted with pneumonia. There were markers of severity indicating a... Continue Reading →

The dead of night

Doctor fatigue has featured heavily in the media this week. There are tragic stories of fatal car accidents, and a survey of anaesthetists has revealed that half have had accidents or near misses after night shifts. As a consultant who works at night rarely now, I look back at the long nights and deep fatigue... Continue Reading →

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