The problem of late-stage consent in Assisted Dying

Assisted-dying law in Canada requires the person to be alert and able to provide consent just before their death. The Government of Canada website on Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD)¬†says, You must be able to give informed consent both: at the time of your request immediately before medical assistance in dying is provided This seemingly... Continue Reading →

A rare and unpleasant duty: involuntary treatment and the deprivation of liberty

One of the most disturbing and unexpected duties of a doctor in training¬†is that of depriving a person of their liberty. The following secanario describes the emotional and intellectual challenges involved in sedating someone against their will to keep them in hospital. It is worth remembering that the doctors asked to deal with these situations... Continue Reading →

Substitutes

You invite the closest relative of a critically ill patient into a private room and discuss what can be done, what can't be done, what's realistic, what's inevitable...and gain a sense of what your patient's attitude to major medical intervention might have been. You ask a question, 'What do you think they would want us... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: