Checklist mentality

  The case for checklists has been made so well – see this fantastic article by Atul Gawande – yet those responsible for embedding them struggle. They are an effort, an obstacle, an apparently petty imposition. I know it’s the right patient! I know they’re not on Warfarin! I know what equipment we need to... Continue Reading →

‘Stuff happens’: patient safety incidents and 2nd victims

Bad things happen in medicine. Sometimes, as doctors or nurses, the things we do, or the things we didn't think of doing, cause harm. How we respond to those incidents determines the direction our careers follow. If the response is catastrophic, and the puncture in our confidence or self-esteem proves irreparable, we may drop out entirely.... Continue Reading →

Accountability, blame and medical error after Bawa-Garba

  The reaction to the Dr Bawa-Garba case has shown that the medical community finds it hard to accept that individuals can be held personally accountable for underperformance (once we exclude malice, drunkenness or other gross examples). Rather, deficiencies in the healthcare system surrounding the individual should be identified and corrected. Don Berwick was very... Continue Reading →

Justice and safety: a dialogue on the case of Dr Bawa-Garba

  Everyone must have a view. Thousands have expressed theirs. Many have committed to funding an independent legal review. None were there. None heard what the jury heard. Most have read the essentials of the case, and we are worried that if we commit a serious clinical error, we may be ‘hounded’, ‘scapegoated’ or ‘persecuted’, first by the criminal... Continue Reading →

Systems and sense

    The controversy surrounding paediatrician Dr Hadiza Bawa-Garba has got me thinking about the relationship between individuals and systems in healthcare. In this case, it has been suggested that system failures, including under-staffing, contributed to a young patient's death. So important do those factors appear, many feel she should be allowed to continue practising... Continue Reading →

Omissions: reading the Kennedy report on Ian Paterson

  This imagined reflection by a doctor who worked with Ian Paterson is, of course, ill-informed. I was not there. But I have read Sir Ian Kennedy’s brilliantly written report (2013), and think that the messages it contains should be seen by the wider medical community. The report is 166 pages long, but perhaps this... Continue Reading →

The place of blame

The importance of a ‘no blame’ culture in the NHS has become axiomatic. It is accepted that the chain of learning that connects adverse healthcare events to improvements in safety is fatally interrupted when incidents are not reported. If people fear blame and censure, they will not report. Berwick focussed on this in his 2013 post-Francis report, ‘A promise to learn –... Continue Reading →

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